Two Key Types of Coaching Clients & What You Need To Know To Easily Market To Them | By Stephan Wiedner

man-how-to-find-a-plumberLet's imagine that tomorrow you wake up and there is a drip under your sink. What do you do?

If you're a do-it-yourselfer, you'll get under the counter and fix it. If not, you'll call a a plumber.

The match between the problem (the leak) and the solution (call a plumber) is very tight.

Now let's think about another common scenario. Let's say you wake up for the 28th Monday in a row feeling disheartened and maybe even downright miserable about having to start another soul-sucking week at your even more soul-sucking job.

What's the solution? Who do you call?

  • Your mom?
  • Your friend?
  • A neighbour?

Unlike the plumbing problem, the coupling between the problem (my career stinks) and the solution (hire a career coach) is loose. Very few people (maybe 1 in 100) think to hire a coach even though there are a lot of people who could benefit from coaching.

In summary...

There are Two Key Types of Coaching Clients:

  1. Those who have a problem in their life and think to hire a coach (the 1%)
  2. Those who have a problem in their life and don't know that coaching is a solution for them (the other 99%).

Back in my starry-eyed glory days of first getting coach training, I was so stoked to help the 99%. In my mind, there was nothing but a humongous sea of opportunity.

I still believe that to be true but I also know that the tactics to marketing to the 1% and the 99% are quite different. And after spending the last 7 years immersed in online marketing for coaches...

Here's what you need to know about the 1% and 99% of coaching clients so you can more easily market to them:

  1. The 99% need more time to convert into paying clients.
  2. The 99% need more education about how coaching works.
  3. The 99% are not looking for coaching. They are looking to solve their specific life problems (get a better job, make more money, gain confidence, manage ADHD, etc...)
  4. The 1% want to be convinced that you are the right coach. They don't need to be convinced that coaching is the right solution.
  5. The 1% want to know the nuts and bolts of coaching (how much is it, the duration of sessions, etc.).
  6. The 1% start by looking for a coach in their area.

I deliberately put point #6 at the end because it's not what coaches want to hear. I talk to so many coaches who insist on working over the phone or Skype and they want to find international clientele. We know you can coach over the phone, but the 1% of coaching clients don't.

And the 1%, the most eager, ready-to-hire, prospective clients look for a coach the same way they look for a dentist, doctor, or physiotherapist. They go online and look for a coach in their area.

So, if you are struggling to fill your roster of clients, you need to start by showing up where the most eager 1% are searching - in local search results.

It can take time for Google to notice and show your website in search results, especially if you haven't done any SEO or search engine optimization. So another way for you to get found locally is to get yourself listed on a coach directory like Noomii. Chosen well, a  high traffic directory of coaches provides another place for that 1% to find you.

Stephan WiednerContributing Author: Stephan Wiedner is the co-founder of Noomii.com, the web's largest company dedicated to matching coaches and clients. He holds an ACC credential with the International Coach Federation. As an Internet entrepreneur, Stephan works remotely and enjoys traveling the world with his young family. SPECIAL OFFER: When people come to Noomii to find a coach near them - help them find you. Check out our great Reader Discount with Noomii today here >>

NOTE: If Noomii hasn't paid for itself by the end of your first year, you can get your money back! Just one client makes Noomii a worthwhile investment - why not start today?

 

If you liked this article about marketing and finding clients, you may also like:

2 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.